January 24, 2022

Supreme Court dismisses challenge to Obama health law

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has dismissed a challenge to the Obama era health care law, preserving insurance coverage for millions of Americans.

The justices, by a 7-2 vote, left the entire law intact Thursday in ruling that Texas, other Republican-led states and two individuals had no right to bring their lawsuit in federal court.

The law’s major provisions include protections for people with pre-existing health conditions, a range of no-cost preventive services and the expansion of the Medicaid program that insures lower-income people, including those who work in jobs that don’t pay much or provide health insurance.

Also left in place is the law’s now-toothless requirement that people have health insurance or pay a penalty. Congress rendered that provision irrelevant in 2017 when it reduced the penalty to zero.

The elimination of the penalty had become the hook that Texas and other Republican-led states, as well as the Trump administration, used to attack the entire law. They argued that without the mandate, a pillar of the law when it was passed in 2010, the rest of the law should fall, too.

And with a more conservative Supreme Court that includes three Trump appointees, opponents of “Obamacare” hoped a majority of the justices would finally kill off the law they have been fighting against for more than a decade.

But the third major attack on the law at the Supreme Court ended the way the first two did, with a majority of the court rebuffing efforts to gut the law or get rid of it altogether.

Trump’s three appointees to the Supreme Court — Justices Amy Coney Barrett, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — split their votes. Kavanaugh and Barrett joined the majority. Gorsuch was in dissent, signing on to an opinion from Justice Samuel Alito.

in Health
Related Posts

Analyzing WH plan to aid veterans suffering from burn pit exposure, suicidal ideations

November 11, 2021

November 11, 2021

Nick Schifrin: Yes, so 3.7 million service members served in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf all the way back...

‘It’s a mission’: Volunteers treat refugees massing at the border

June 21, 2021

June 21, 2021

TIJUANA, Mexico — El Chaparral Plaza once teemed with tourists, street vendors and idling taxis. But the plaza, just outside...

Desperate for home care, seniors often wait months with workers in short supply

June 30, 2021

June 30, 2021

CASTINE, Maine — For years, Louise Shackett has had trouble walking or standing for long periods, making it difficult for...

Can schools require COVID-19 vaccines for students 12 and up?

May 17, 2021

May 17, 2021

With the first COVID-19 vaccine now authorized for adolescents, ages 12 and up, a big question looms: Will students be...

In Louisiana, government skepticism is hurting vaccination rates. Will incentives help?

June 17, 2021

June 17, 2021

Dr. Joseph Kanter, Louisiana State Health Officer: Thanks, William. It’s really nice to be with you. Look, it really does...

Puerto Rico to receive nearly $4 billion in U.S. pandemic funds

June 28, 2021

June 28, 2021

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said Monday that Puerto Rico will receive nearly $4...

WATCH: What’s behind rising domestic and gun violence during the pandemic?

June 14, 2021

June 14, 2021

Warning: This conversation will include discussion of domestic and gun violence. The United States is home to 4 percent of...

US life expectancy sees ‘massive’ decline, especially in Black and brown communities

June 24, 2021

June 24, 2021

A new study found that between 2018 and 2020, U.S. life expectancy decreased by the biggest margin since world war...

Carbon dioxide in the air has reached another dangerous milestone

June 7, 2021

June 7, 2021

The annual peak of global heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air has reached another dangerous milestone: 50% higher than when...

‘Pandemic misery index’ charts far-reaching, imbalanced impacts of COVID-19

June 2, 2021

June 2, 2021

With more than 30 million people infected and 550,000 dead, the U.S. is among the nations hardest hit by the...

US sends Taiwan 2.5 million vaccine doses, tripling pledge

June 20, 2021

June 20, 2021

TAIPEI, Taiwan — The U.S. sent 2.5 million doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to Taiwan on Sunday, tripling an...

This chart shows how COVID cases have plummeted as more people get vaccinated

June 8, 2021

June 8, 2021

Less than six months ago, the coronavirus crisis was at its most deadly point. Now, with more than half the...

Who benefits? U.S. debates fairest way to share spare vaccine

May 31, 2021

May 31, 2021

WASHINGTON (AP) — In April, the Biden administration announced plans to share millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses with the world...

As variant rises, vaccine plan targets ‘movable middle’

June 27, 2021

June 27, 2021

WASHINGTON — Thrown off-stride to reach its COVID-19 vaccination goal, the Biden administration is sending A-list officials across the country,...

Novavax data suggests its COVID-19 vaccine is highly effective

June 14, 2021

June 14, 2021

Vaccine maker Novavax said Monday its shot was highly effective against COVID-19 and also protected against variants in a large,...